Want to eat at a top Ginza restaurant but don’t feel like busting your budget? There is actually a way for you to do that. If you’re not in the know yet, it is quite common for Tokyo restaurants to serve meals at affordable prices during lunch hours. Just about every other establishment has some sort of mid-day promotions such as special lunch sets or complementary servings of a particular dish. In this neighborhood known for its expensive dining, this is an obvious treat. Moreover, you will be spoiled with choices especially if you’re craving Japanese food. Browse this list of the best lunch restaurants in Ginza to see what we’re talking about.

Sushi

Sushi Tokami (鮨とかみ)

A tag price of ¥5,000 for the cheapest lunch set may still seem steep, but if you consider that Sushi Tokami is one of Tokyo’s premium sushi joints awarded with a 1 Michelin star rating and a consistently high Tabelog ranking, you’d most likely be one of the many people rushing to get a reservation. Behind its counter is Chef Hiroyuki Sato, one of Tokyo’s next generation sushi masters; who aside from being responsible for making exceptional sushi, also makes sure that the dining atmosphere is light with his candidness and English-speaking abilities.

Address: B1F Ginza Seiwa Silver Building 8-2-10 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥5,000 ~ ¥12,000

Website: http://sushitokami.3zoku.com/11home.html

Sushi Ishijima (鮨石島)

Just because a restaurant isn’t helmed by a star chef doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t expect great sushi from it. The mere proximity of Ginza to the famed Tsukiji market almost automatically assures the abundance of quality sushi places for each type of budget. Sushi Ishijima belongs to the mid-tier category where chefs are more than capable of serving delectable pieces in a typical restaurant environment that gives diners a choice between counter seats and Japanese-style private rooms. A 10-piece lunch plate only costs ¥1,500, but do take note that this too good of a deal often entails long lines. Thus, it is best to come early to get a headstart.

Address: 1-24-3 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,500 ~ ¥4,000

Website: http://www.sushi-ishijima.com (Japanese only)

Ginza Sushi Dokoro Marui (銀座寿司処 まる伊)

Ginza Sushi Dokoro Marui is particularly popular for their lunch menu. Aside from the usual assorted sushi platter, their Chirashi Sushi (sushi rice bowl with a selection of sushi toppings) is a favorite especially among office ladies and salarymen working in the area. These bowls come in several varieties, which is another plus factor on top of its amazing everything below ¥2,000 price point.

Address: 3-8-15 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: http://ginza-maruisushi.com/english.html

Soba

Sasuga (流石)

Unlike other shops, Sasuga only offers 100% unadulterated soba both in terms of the ingredients used and the laborious process entailed in making them. It only uses buckwheat flour and relies on the traditional method of hand-kneading to produce the tastiest and sweetest-smelling noodles you could have in Tokyo. Served hot or cold, it is best partnered with the restaurant’s equally delectable appetizers. The lunch set comes with two of these side dishes plus a dessert.

Address: 2F Toji Building 2-13-16 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: http://ginza-sasuga.jp/english/index.html

Yamagatada (山形田)

The topography and climate in northern Japan make its plains ideal for growing soba buckwheat. Fortunately for Tokyoites, they don’t need to travel all the way to Yamagata Prefecture to sample these regional noodles because of this soba house in Ginza. The place is nothing fancy, but the flavors are authentic. If you want to go for their bestseller, order the Tori Soba (chicken noodles).

Address: 3-8-15 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1301/A130101/13111033/ (Japanese only)

Sanada (真田)

Sanada is a Soba Kaiseki-style restaurant that aims to bring into the forefront the flavors derived from the seasonal produce of Nagano Prefecture. Expect a filling feast of various side dishes that perfectly complements the meal’s main highlight, the soba noodles. The set comes with a serving of dessert, and to complete this very traditional dining experience, ordering sake would be a great idea.

Address: 3F Ginza 745 Building 5-6-5 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: http://ginza-sanada.com (Japanese only)

Tempura

Tempura Kondo (てんぷら 近藤)

One of the fascinating things about Tokyo’s dining scene is its ability to transform something seemingly simple into an art form. Take the case of tempura, which is essentially just a bunch of deep fried ingredients rolled in batter mixture. By design it is a rather simple food, and yet there’s a high-end restaurant like Tempura Kondo for this dish and a 2-Michelin star rating holder at that. If the idea of gourmet fried food piqued your curiosity, Tempura Kondo’s basic lunch set offering consists of 4 vegetable pieces, 3 kinds of fish, 2 shrimp servings, miso and rice. Everything is cooked in front of you, and just by observing how the ingredients are delicately handled, you can begin to understand the finer details that set the tempura served here from all the other fried stuff served in other places.

Address: 9F Sakaguchi Building 5 Chome-5-13 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥8,000 ~ ¥9,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1301/A130101/13004993/ (Japanese only)

Ginza Kohageten (小ハゲ天 銀座店)

Kohageten is the casual dining branch of popular tempura restaurant Hageten – a fried food specialist since 1928. Aside from tempura, it also specializes in Kushiage, a dish made of a variety of vegetable and meat ingredients put on skewers and then deep-fried. Their lunch sets are priced incredibly cheap considering the quality they serve. Kushiage lunch options start at ¥800, while ¥1200 already fixes you a nice tendon bowl (rice topped with tempura). Extend your budget a little more, and you can enjoy a tempura feast, which includes Kohageten’s popular Kakiage mixed ingredient tempura.

Address: 5-6-7 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.hageten.com/english/

Ginza Kasuga (ぎんざ春日)

This small 10-counter seat restaurant is a favorite lunch spot for its tendon. For its affordable price, it’s a delightful surprise to find this bowl a luxurious one with seasonal tempura toppings that include items like prawns, sand borer, and conger eel.

Address: 1-4-6 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: http://www.ginza-kasuga.com (Japanese only)

Teppanyaki

Sagagyu Kira (佐賀牛 季楽 銀座)

Saga beef is a high-quality Wagyu brand whose meat grade is comparable to its more popular counterparts Kobe and Matsuzaka beef. Outside Saga Prefecture, there aren’t as many places to sample this premium meat, but when in Tokyo, the most recommended restaurant is Kira. As with any Wagyu-specializing restaurant, exorbitant prices are to be expected. Lunch courses, however, are about half the price of dinner specials. Definitely a steal!

Address: 5F Royal Crystal Ginza Building 5-4-6 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥4,000 ~ ¥9,000

Website: http://kira.saga-ja.jp/en/

Ahill Ginza

Ahill Ginza is technically not a Japanese restaurant, but it does employ Teppan-style cooking and serves Wagyu beef. The signature entrée is Salisbury steak made from A5 rank Wagyu, branded pork, and foie gras. This main course is preceded by three starter dishes and soup. Optional items to order are Ahill’s fried curry rice and your choice of dessert.

Address: 8F Ginza Velvia Building 2 Chome-4-6 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥2,000 ~ ¥2,999

Website: http://www.ahill.jp (Japanese only)

Ginza Koso

You know that a restaurant serves the finest meat if they are able to serve it raw. Yes, you read it right – raw beef. Ginza Koso is one of the very few restaurants in Tokyo licensed to handle and serve raw Kuroge Wagyu (highest ranked Japanese beef) and in here, you can have it in a number of ways. The signature dish is raw meat sushi (only available for dinner), however, if you still prefer the cooked option, don’t fret because juicy steaks and hamburgers can be your picks instead. For lunch, you can choose between several options of set meals and lunch courses. For the latter, you need to make a reservation.

Address: 8-8-8 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,500 ~ ¥7,000

Website: http://www.ginza8888.net/en/

Shabu Shabu

Hidagyu Ittoya Ginza Bakuro Ichidai (飛騨牛一頭家 銀座 馬喰一代)

Dining at Bakuro Ichidai means you get to enjoy premium Hida Wagyu and authentic Gifu Prefecture flavors in a stylish yet comfortable environment. You get to cook your meal too as the in-house specialties are Shabu Shabu, Sukiyaki, and Yakiniku. It is the perfect setting for group lunches or dinners as these dishes really bring out the social aspect of eating.

Address: 11F Ginza Trecious Building 2-6-5 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,500 ~ ¥6,000

Website: http://ginza.bakuroichidai.co.jp/top.html (Japanese only)

Kakiyasu (柿安銀座店)

Kakiyasu is one of the restaurants that truly reflects Ginza’s character. It is the convergence of style, substance, modern sensibilities, and long traditions. This restaurant exudes class without ever trying too hard. Rather, it is the likely result of over 140 years of experience and commitment to deliver only the highest quality ingredients prepared and served with utmost care. From choice ingredients like Matsuzaka Wagyu to the gorgeous table setting, this could be a candidate for your most iconic meal in the city.

Address: 7F Ginza gCube 7-9-15 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥2,000 ~ ¥15,000

Website: http://www.kakiyasuhonten.co.jp/brand/1kakiyasu/index.html (Japanese only)

Kisshou (吉祥 銀座本店)

Kisshou offers something more upscale with the incorporation of a seasonal approach to their menu. Same as Kakiyasu, it is a long-standing establishment with over 60 years of history. Their lunch offerings vary with the budget; a simple but complete lunch box meal being the most basic, while the most extravagant choice could either be a Wagyu hotpot or a Kaiseki course.

Address: 4F Royal Crystal Building 5 Chome-4-6 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥3,500 ~ ¥13,000

Website: http://www.kissho.co.jp/english/

Kaiseki

Toku Uchiyama (徳うち山)

Tai Chazuke dish is this restaurant’s signature item, which is the deceptively simple but actually hard to balance fish sashimi poured with tea. It is served with a bowl of rice and a saucer of pickles. This is the highlight of Toku Uchiyama Kaiseki dinners and lunch courses. The place is rather small and intimate so only diners with reservations will be entertained. Strictly no walk-ins are allowed.

Address: 3-12-9 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥5,000 ~ ¥8,000

Website: http://toku-uchiyama.co.jp (Japanese only)

Ginza Koju (銀座 小十)

Should you decide to ditch the budget and dive head first into the fanciest Japanese feast you can have in the city, might as well do it at Ginza Koju. Not only are the ingredients fresh and aligned with the season, but there’s also the expertise in bringing out the natural essence of food. This place doesn’t have a menu, so instead, you will have to trust its renowned chef Toru Okuda to pleasantly surprise you. In case this arrangement somehow leaves you with doubts, this place has a 3-Michelin star rating. Know that you’re in good hands.

Address: 4F Carioca Building 5 Chome-4-8 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥20,000 ~ ¥29,999

Website: http://www.kojyu.jp (Japanese only)

Ginza Okuda (銀座奥田)

This is the second restaurant of Ginza Koju’s Chef Toru Okuda. Opened in 2012, it follows the same template as Koju when it comes to the concept, ambiance, and offerings. The main difference is that it is helmed by Chef Okuda’s disciple – Chef Shun Miyahara, and the relatively lesser price point. Nevertheless, it is decorated with 2 Michelin stars, and the fact that it carries the Okuda brand in its name is more than enough reason to expect nothing less than a spectacular dining experience from this establishment.

Address: B1F Carioca Building 5 Chome-4-8 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥10,000 ~ ¥19,999

Website: http://www.ginzaokuda.com/en/news/

Tonkatsu

Tsukiji Tonki (築地とんき)

Tonki has been one of Ginza’s go-to places for Tonkatsu for more than 70 years. You’ll be dining with a lot of regulars here, silently enjoying together slow-cooked pork packed with intense flavors. There are only three dishes to choose from: Roasted Tonkatsu, Tonkatsu fillet, and Skewer Tonkatsu. Each meal comes with cabbage (free unlimited refills), pork soup (refillable once), and a bowl of rice.

Address: 1-12-22 Tsukiji, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1301/A130101/13056296/ (Japanese only)

Nishimura (にし邑)

If you happen to wander around Ginza’s Kabukiza Theater, you most definitely need to drop by Nishimura as well. Its thick and juicy pork cutlets enveloped in crunchy crumbs make it the ultimate definitions of comfort food. Never mind your diet; you get to have unlimited servings of cabbage to have an illusion of a balanced meal anyway!

Address: 3 Chome-12-6 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1301/A130101/13025298/ (Japanese only)

Ginza Isen (銀座 井泉)

Tonkatsu may be a simple dish, but as with all types of food, not all Japanese deep-fried pork cutlets are made equal. The one by Ginza Isen stands out with pork so soft you can cut them up with your chopsticks! You need to search for it though by combing through Ginza’s unassuming back streets.

Address: 2F Kyodo Ginza-dori Building 6-12-15 Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1301/A130101/13167264/ (Japanese only)

All price information in this article are as of November 2016.

Thumbnail picture is from Flickr.