Finding good food is never a hard task while visiting Tokyo. In fact, you can easily stumble upon a yummy treat while walking around its city streets. Thus, it is a must that as you go about your sightseeing, you make sure to fill your tummies as well. Be on the lookout for these popular Tokyo street food items. They are most certainly the yummiest out there!

Soft Serve Ice Cream

Ice cream is pretty common around the world, but in Japan, it’s a bit more exciting. Prepare yourself to have a hard time selecting your choice of flavor as there are so many to choose from. There are even novelty flavors such as sakura ice cream during the cherry blossom season. You can find a lot of ice cream stalls in popular tourist areas like Nakamisedori in Asakusa, but for something special, seek out stores with premium offerings. Dolci Café Silkream in Shibuya serves the Cremia soft serve. It’s an ice cream dessert popular for being extra creamy and extra milky flavor as it uses Hokkaido milk and heavy whip cream. The cone is extra special, too, because instead of a wafer, it is made up of langue de chat cookies shaped into a cone.

Dolci Café Silkream

Address: 1F Haimanten Jinnan Building, 1-19-3 Jinnan, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo

Price: ¥1,000 ~ ¥1,999

Website: https://www.nissei-com.co.jp/silkream/en/

Melon Pan

For a classic snack, there’s the melon pan. It’s a bread treat exploding with milk and butter flavors. Its crust is drizzled with crystallized sugar and whose appearance resembles that of a melon – hence, its name. While melon pan is a convenience store staple, you have to try the ones sold at Asakusa Kagetsudo to have a taste of the real deal. Their Jumbo Melon Pan is a certified bestseller, but if you happen to visit during the summer, you’re in for a special treat. The Ice Cream Melon Bread is a seasonal offering – melon bread stuffed with ice cream in the middle!

Asakusa Kagetsudo

Address: 2-7-13 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.asakusa-kagetudo.com/ (Japanese only)

Croquette

Korokke is the Japanese rendition of the Western snack croquette. These are deep fried snacks with different kinds of stuffing like combinations of meat and vegetables. It can be a simple one like shredded cabbage, potatoes, and eggs, or it could be made with more filling ingredients such as Wagyu beef. If you’re a fan of the latter, do check out Niku No Oyama in Ueno’s Ameyoko shopping area. The most recommended dish is Yamitsuki Croquette stuffed with potato and meat.

Niku No Oyama

Address: 6-13-2 Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.ohyama.com/ (Japanese only)

Dango

Dango is a traditional dessert that is visually appealing as it is tasty. It is made of rice flour dumplings and best paired with tea. There are many types of dango and served a number of ways, but for convenience, go for the skewered ones, which you can get at Oiwake Dango (Shinjuku) and Kikuya (Asakusa).

Oiwake Dango

Address: 3-1-22 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.oiwakedango.co.jp/ (Japanese only)

Kikuya

Address: 1-20-1 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.kikuya-nakamise.com/english/

Taiyaki

This fish-shaped cake is another traditional dessert that you shouldn’t miss. Its crust is made with waffle batter while the inside is filled with sweetened azuki bean paste, or sometimes, with custard, chocolate, or cheese. It is best enjoyed when it’s freshly baked. Popular shops include Naniwaya Sohonten and Gindaco Akihabara. The former is the originator of this treat and has been selling it since 1909, while the latter is famous for its modernized croissant taiyaki version.

Naniwaya Sohonten

Address: 1 Chome-8-14, Azabujuban, Minato-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://a-naniwaya.com/ (Japanese only)

Gindaco Akihabara

Address: 1-1 Kanda Hanaokacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.croissant-taiyaki.com/ (Japanese only)

Rice Cracker

Senbei or rice cracker is the quintessential traditional Japanese snack. It comes in different shapes, sizes, and flavors, but the classic version is a round shaped cracker flavored with soy sauce. It is typical to find packed senbei treats in shops around the city – from convenience stores to souvenir shops. However, nothing beats the hot off the grill ones, which you can buy from specialty shops like Iriyama Senbei – an establishment in Asakusa that has been in business since 1914.

Iriyama Senbei

Address: 1 Chome-13-4 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1311/A131102/13037722/ (Japanese only)

Takoyaki

One great perk of touring the capital city is easy to access regional food specialties, like for instance, the takoyaki. This popular snack, which originated from Osaka, is a quirky ball of batter, octopus, and dashi soup stock topped with Japanese mayo, bonito flakes, and sauce. In the areas around Tokyo, it is considered more of a snack eaten during summer festivals, but good thing, there are several go-to establishments that serve this casual dish all year round. One of the most recommended is Ginza Fukuyoshi. Their takoyaki is so flavorful that you can even eat it without the sauce.

Ginza Fukuyoshi

Address: 3-12-19 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.ginzafukuyoshi.com/ (Japanese only)

Raw and grilled seafood

Of course, if you’re sightseeing around Tsukiji area, expect nothing but seafood goodies to whet your appetite. Indulge in sea urchin and sea oysters if you like them raw, or go for grilled skewers of various types of seafood. Some of the most recommended stalls are Saito Suisan, where you can buy raw oysters per piece, and Uni Torakurau for sea urchin and scallop skewers.

Saito Suisan

Address: 4-10-5 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1313/A131301/13147413/ (Japanese only)

Uni Torakurau

Address: 4-10-14 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Price: ¥3,000 ~ ¥3,999

Website: http://www.itadori.co.jp/shop/unitora_kurau.html (Japanese only)

Kamaboko

Kamaboko is a fish cake packed with flavors. It is usually served steamed, grilled, fried, or poached, and has a unique chewy texture, which is just perfect for snacking. Popular since the Japanese Heian period, kamaboko can be commonly seen sold in convenience stores, but of course, you can always do better by seeking out Suzuhiro – one of Japan’s best-known makers of kamaboko. Their store in Tokyo is located in Asakusa, while just a couple of hours train ride from the city– in Hakone and Odawara, the company also has a Suzuhiro Kamaboko Village where visitors can enjoy traditional kamaboko making workshops.

Suzuhiro

Address: 1-38-1 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.kamaboko.com/en/

Menchikatsu

Seasoned, breaded, and deep fried minced meat patties, menchikatsu is the choice street food of meat lovers. It’s the perfect meal on the go as it’s yummy, handy, and very filling. It will surely give you the energy you need as you go around Tokyo’s most interesting sightseeing spots. One of the most popular places to buy menchikatsu is Niku No Oyama, the same shop famous for its croquettes. Another option is Asakusa Menchi, located not far from the Nakamise-dori shopping street.

Asakusa Menchi

Address: 2-3-3 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://asamen.com/ (Japanese only)

Dorayaki

Dorayaki is one of Japan’s most famous sweet snacks. It looks like a double pancake with azuki bean paste filling. The dough is moist and fluffy, while the inside offers just the right amount of sweetness. Two of the most established and well-loved dorayaki shops in Tokyo are Usagiya and Kameju. Prepare to wait it out in long lines to get your hands on this special treat.

Usagiya

Address: 1-10-10 Ueno, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.ueno-usagiya.jp/ (Japanese only)

Kameju

Address: 2 Chome-18-11 Kaminarimon, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1311/A131102/13003655/ (Japanese only)

Pork bun

Care for some dim sum? You can also get really good steamed pork buns while traveling in Tokyo. It’s a great alternative if you want to take a break from fried food, and because it’s meat, it is guaranteed to be a filling snack. The best place to go for a pork bun is Sekine in Asakusa, or for a more convenient option, there are several PAOPAO branches in Tokyo for a tasty dim sum to go.

Sekine

Address: 1-23-6 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.asakusa-shinnaka.com/shop-info/sekine.html

PAOPAO

Address: 1-1-4 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.mj-sangyo.co.jp/enterprise/delicatessen/paopao/ (Japanese only)

Crepes

Crepe is the undisputed star of the Harajuku food scene. It just seems fitting as this dessert exemplifies the chic character, the vibrant colors, and the sweetness of this fashionable Tokyo neighborhood. Numerous crepe stalls dot Harajuku’s main alley, the Takeshita-dori, but the one that’s most recommended is Marion Crepes. This crepe shop is credited to have started the crepe craze in the area. Enjoy the many ways you can have your crepe by selecting your dough texture, flavors, and over 70 filling combos!

Marion Crepes

Address: 1-6-15 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://www.marion.co.jp/english/

Zakuzaku

Zakuzaku is one of the more recent snack obsessions to hit Tokyo. It is a yummy dessert snack hailing from Hokkaido, which is basically a reimagined cream puff that is shaped like a bread stick and coated with crunchy almonds. It has four stores in Tokyo, and the most accessible ones can be found in Harajuku and at Shinjuku Lumine Est.

Address: Cute Cube Harajuku 1F, 1 Chome-7-1 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://en.zakuzaku.co.jp/

Bake

This one is for the cheese lovers. This tart is made from three types of cheese and uses only the finest dairy ingredients from Hokkaido. Every bite is a premium one. Definitely, worth lining up for!

Address: 1F Lumine Est Shinjuku, 3-38-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://bakecheesetart.com/index_en.html

 

All price information in this article is as of August 2017.

Thumbnail image is from Flickr.