Shinjuku is one of the best places in Tokyo to go on a drinking spree. For one, the choices available to you are endless. Whether it’s beer, wine, or cocktails you’re having, there’s a posh lounge with a city view to chill at, or a tiny basement dive bar playing vinyl to hole up in. Each establishment carries its own unique charm, from familiar concepts to the downright eccentric, that it would be accurate to say that going out for drinks in Shinjuku is more than just about the alcohol, it’s an experience in itself. To get started with your exploration, see if any of these places in this list suits you. Here are the 10 best bars in Shinjuku to match different kinds of moods:

Bar Le Parrain (ル・パラン)

Stepping into Bar Le Parrain, you’d instantly pick up the inspiration behind the place – The Godfather. Dim lighting, the use of hardwood and old furniture, the lingering scent of cigars in the air, this bar could pass off as Don Corleone’s den in the famous mafia movie. The atmosphere is very adult and on the serious side. It’s one of those places to go when you’re feeling contemplative with a classic drink in hand.

Address: 3-6-13 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥4,000 ~ ¥4,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1304/A130401/13000988/ (Japanese only)

Totokichi (とときち)

Izakaya is the classic Japanese bar. The term is now broadly used for bars that serve alcohol, but if we were to be strict about it, an izakaya is a place to specifically drink sake. Totokichi is one such establishment, and true to being a sake specialist, it has an impressive selection of rare bottles from all over the country. You can’t get in if you won’t drink sake. If it’s your first time to try, it’s a great bar to get schooled on Japan’s representative alcoholic drink. Not to mention, the food menu is likewise commendable. House specialty is seafood. Served raw or otherwise, their courses make an excellent pairing with their sake repertoire.

Address: 3-6-13 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥5,000 ~ ¥5,999

Website: http://www.totokichi.co.jp (Japanese only)

Caruso (カルーソー)

Caruso is another atmospheric bar to hole up in and enjoy quality liquor. The place is rather intimate and can only accommodate a handful of people. Lighting is sparse, and opera music plays in the background. The bartender can fix you up a cocktail, or you can opt to go through their assortment of hard drinks. It’s definitely not the bar for party drinking. Rather, go here for a quiet drink alone or with someone.

Address: Hirata Building 2F, 3-8-8 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥3,000 ~ ¥3,999

Website: https://tabelog.com/en/tokyo/A1304/A130401/13111408/ (Japanese only)

BERG

Berg is a café-cum-bar located at the east exit of Shinjuku Station. It’s a casual place to have hearty meals from breakfast to dinner, and if you’re one to enjoy a glass of tap beer in the morning, this restaurant was meant for the likes of you. The selection isn’t that extensive, but they do have some Japanese craft beer in their line up. They also offer beer combos to partner your choice brew with great-with-beer food items like German sausages. With reasonable prices and convenient location, BERG is that dependable option when you simply just want to grab a quick drink.

Address: 3-38-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ~ ¥999

Website: http://berg.s1.bindsite.jp/sako3/cn23/berg-list.html (Japanese only)

CAPCOM Bar

Anyone who grew up doing the “Hadouken” or knowing what the “T-virus” is will certainly lose their heads in excitement at CAPCOM Bar. This recent addition to Tokyo’s themed resto-bar scene is all about recreating CAPCOM’s gaming worlds – Street Fighter, Resident Evil, Ace Attorney, and so on. From food styling to overloading its premises with character memorabilia, there sure is a long list of things to delight a fan; and true to its promise of being a gamer’s haven, expect to find consoles on standby, each loaded with demo games. Do take note though that this restaurant employs a batching system for accepting guests, where each batch of diners gets to spend about 2 hours inside. For more details about the schedule, you can check out CAPCOM Bar’s official website through the link provided below.

Address: 1F Pasela Resorts Building 1-3-16 Kabukicho, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥2,000 ~ ¥2,999

Website: http://www.paselabo.tv/capcombar/

Itteki Hassenya (一滴八銭屋)

An udon restaurant by day and an izakaya at night, Itteki Hassenya is one of those local no-frills bars to dine, drink, and have fun conversations with friends. Besides noodles, their menu consists of other Japanese dishes like oden and tempura. For the spirits, they have on offer 20 different kinds of sake from all over Japan and several beer options. The space is large enough to comfortably seat groups, and the pricing is just right. If the company is more important than a specific ambiance, then this should be a perfect location for your group’s Shinjuku night out. It’s a convenient 3-minute walk from Shinjuku Station West Exit.

Address: 1-15-9 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥4,000 ~ ¥4,999

Website: http://www.itteki.com (Japanese only)

Kirin City

A beer hall by one of Japan’s biggest breweries, Kirin City is where you need to go to sample anything that has got to do with Kirin Beer. You can start with ordering the usual Kirin beer varieties on tap: Kirin Lager is the local favorite, while Kirin Ichiban is the brand’s flagship brew. As you go along, move on to the in-house exclusives like their Half & Half concoctions, beer cocktails, and the Frozen Beer alternatives. There’s quite an extensive food menu of mostly Western dishes to perfectly match your drink, and as far as drinking environments go, it is cheery and chatty as to be expected from a beer-loving crowd.

Address: 3-25-9 Shinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥2,000 ~ ¥2,999

Website: http://www.kirincity.co.jp (Japanese only)

Albatross

Spread across three floors, Albatross is cramped with booze, some art pieces, and a lot of character. It attracts an interesting crowd, but then again this particular Shinjuku neighborhood called Golden Gai is a hive of bars with unique charms. You’ll probably end up visiting more than just one bar, but do make Albatross your first stop. Since it is among the foreigner-friendly ones, picking up and easing into Golden Gai’s bar culture will be less awkward. After all, cover charge is just ¥300 per person, inexpensive based on area standards.

Address: Golden Gai 5th Street, 1-1-7 Kabukicho, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥2,000 ~ ¥2,999

Website: http://www.alba-s.com (Japanese only)

Bar Ben Fiddich

Ben Fiddich is one of the most interesting bars to visit in Tokyo. Here, jars of different roots, herbs, spices, and other infusions line the shelves and counter tops along with bottles of wine, whiskey, and other spirits. Behind the counter, Hiroyasu Kayama – the bar owner and bartender, whips up experimental concoctions by putting together a bunch of these different ingredients you wouldn’t usually associate with cocktails. Just trust in his skills that the resulting drink will be something that is both out of ordinary and delightful. In any case, watching him work and learning how he builds drinks from scratch is by itself already amazing. It’s a sip of modern alchemy and you’d be missing out on a lot if you don’t plan a visit.

Address: 9F Yamato House Building 1-13-7 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥4,000 ~ ¥4,999

Website: https://www.facebook.com/BarBenfiddich

The Peak Lounge & Bar

Drinking with a majestic view of the city will never go out of style, and this is one of the reasons why Park Hyatt’s The Peak Lounge & Bar will always get a mention in any list that features the best bars in Shinjuku. It is also particularly famous for being one of the places featured in the film Lost In Translation. If you come by around twilight, you’re just in time for the happy hour. Between 5 to 9 PM, indulge in free-flowing wine, cocktails, and a variety of finger foods.

Address: 41F Park Hyatt Hotel 3-7-1 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo

Price: ¥5,000 ~ ¥5,999

Website: https://tokyo.park.hyatt.com/en/hotel/dining/ThePeakBar.html

All price information in this article is as of January 2017.

Thumbnail image is from Flickr.